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Monthly Archives: April 2015

P&C

We are entering a fresh season of baseball; from Little League fields to professional stadiums baseball players are honing their skills to play their part in the games on the schedule.  On a daily basis, our military trains to prepare for the moments of battle that will require their skills to be put to task.  Whether turning a double play, laying down a bunt, knowing fields of fire or following a battle plan, practice and training are essential to win a game or in the most dire of situations, stay alive.

When it comes to practice and training on a regular basis in the funeral business, regular meaningful practice and training is a rarity. Yes, I do understand that funeral homes are busy and we never know when the next phone calls can mean days and hours of focusing on one of the most important event of a person’s life; a funeral for their loved one. I also understand and know that there are times where there is not such activities being conducted where we could hone our skills.

From my experience, some of the best ideas are the result of practice and training sessions when those involved have engaged not because of mandate, rather the innate opportunity to carry out “the play” or “scenario”  and revealing gaps otherwise not recognized.  At our funeral home brands, practice and training for the many tasks required of this profession have created a culture of continuous improvement.  What are the results?

Elimination of mistakes by following process.  Mistakes are made by everyone; however training eliminates repetitive errors.  If you think about it, errors may be simple or drastic, some may be costly.  For instance, how many times in transition from the funeral home to a place of service has items been left behind?  It costs money and consternation to return to the funeral home to retrieve forgotten items (CD.’s, Reserved Markers, etc.). How about receiving a body at the funeral home?  Identification measures and process is a training opportunity; we have recently read news stories of the wrong body being cremated, do you think that  mistake is going to be costly?

From my assessment,  for every mistake or mishap in a funeral home, training would have been a preventative measure.  Think about it, what problem in our daily funeral home activities cannot be corrected with practice or training ?  Funeral home leaders must be intentional and make the time for practice and training; the results are worth the effort.  Literally taking 15 minutes a few days a week can create a culture of continuous improvement and better morale…after all, who does not like to win?

Well as you know if there is a gap, I’m paying attention. Don’t let your untrained heart be troubled, help is on the way!  Stay tuned.  From the desk of The Funeral Commander, Cheers Y’all!  #thefuneralcommander

conversation starterI’m just returning from another funeral convention and I would like to provide “color” on my observations.  I had conversations and meetings with many people from practically every facet of the funeral industry, however I am certain those conversations would not get published in any industry magazines…somewhat lends back to “The Truth” series I recently posted.

From vendors, the majority complained of a lack of attendance from buyers and decision makers. On opening day of the exhibit hall, a cannon could have been fired down most isles and not hit nary a funeral service provider.  Something new and never done before was the presence of a suicide prevention booth; however it was hard to get in as it was jam packed with new vendors/first timers seeking counseling trying to figure out why their booth is not full of buyers (I guess they failed to read and take my advice on being an entrepreneur in the funeral industry).  The non-conventional conversation among this particular crowd (vendors) was that “second tier” organizations should consider events with exhibits such as these perhaps every other year.  The cost to attend, lack of ROI, and dwindling attendance is going to force some tough decisions in the future from a vendor participation perspective.  Suggestions of one big annual funeral expo that covers funeral directors, cremationists and cemeterians would suffice with perhaps individual breakout sessions if needed for organizations.  The individual organization fiefdom is a drain on vendors, members and participants.  Every state has its own annual organizational gathering repeating the same madness but on a smaller scale.  The smart states have completely eliminated exhibits.  So my vote (and I’m sure lots of others if they had one) is to let’s quit doing the same thing the wrong way over and over again…what’s that called?

The speakers and breakout sessions had excellent content with relevant information.  Again on the notion of “one big funeral gathering” with many speakers and subjects would stop the redundant messaging under different flags…so maybe the presentations given at the “one big funeral gathering” could be recorded then retrieved in an archived library for those not attending.  That sounds like a smart revenue generation model with mass appeal, but what do I know?

Speaking of tough decisions, the funeral service providers I had the privilege of chatting with provided me with realistic reports of their experiences at providing services/products to the ever changing consumer.  Outside of the emerging Social Media, technology and of course DNA collection (yes, that’s a shameless but true plug) they saw nothing really addressed how to provide better service to the consumers they serve.  Think about that for a moment.  Basically, if the company/vendor is not providing or improving upon a technology based solutions (sales, service, arrangements, B2C marketing, operations, or product) then the relevancy to a funeral service provider is benign.

An interesting and emerging segment that was present in technology seems to be a platform for consumers to memorialize themselves using an online portal to capture their life stories, videos, etc. (I guess Facebook/online obits is just not getting the job done).  The fallacy for most is the choice some really odd names which I personally wonder how consumers find them in the first place.  One of those odd named providers makes claim that their product/service helps with the “family experience” but when I drilled down a bit I got the old “we’re still working on that” position.  Basically, capturing a life well lived is a great notion, in fact some of these cats have somehow found people (companies) to invest in this idea without a strong revenue generation model (you know, pay back investors’ money).  Aurora’s value added Be Remembered has all of the components for such a platform (at no cost to the consumer or funeral home) which leads me to believe that others fail to do any relevant market research before launch.

The best non-conventional conversations took place off the floor with a drink in one hand and a cigar in the other (yes, that’s my favorite environment for great conversations). I think that all would agree such funeral gatherings provide a platform for those in attendance to have all important face to face interactions.  During these important extemporaneous sessions,  I actually was made privy to a new product that I think is brilliant; cremated remains, the life story, storage and columbarium all in one…technology, sleek design and a solution.  Another was about a new brand of funeral service to consumers; a collaborative effort for a brand that will capture and address the majority market in America…the 75% that make less than $50,000.  Those folks die too, but we don’t talk about them much.  Finally, this is a big world but getting smaller.  The alliances of companies collaborating on a global scale are becoming more commonplace.  I personally had conversations with people from Canada, Australia, Spain, Italy, China, Ireland and even New Jersey.

In a nutshell, if it’s not a technology driven product at the exhibitions and expos that assists funeral directors to provide enhanced service to their consumers, the interest level is dwindling.  There is always some that will pine for the days of yore, but those days are going away with facsimile machines.  The from my vantage point, defined success for the future in the funeral industry is messaging, technology and collaboration.  That’s the view from the field and The Funeral Commander.  Cheers Y’all! #thefuneralcommander

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