DNA Information; Another Professional Opportunity to Assist Funeral Consumers

DNA post

Nearly every day there are news feeds that address the topic of DNA.  Just yesterday, Legacy.com  posted an interesting article, What Can DNA Tell You About How You’ll Die?”  From science and medicine to solving crimes, consumers are becoming more familiar with the power of genetic developments and with DNA in particular.  For funeral directors, DNA and genetic advancements provide a new topic that adds to their professional knowledge and an informal obligation to provide some genetic information to the families they serve.

Information that is important to funeral consumers:

  • The cremation process is an irreversible process.
  • All DNA is lost (destroyed) during the cremation process.
  • Disinterment is costly; emotionally and financially (in some cases/areas may require legal action).

These three elements are factual and have relevance…but why?  Think about it, whether your funeral home provides a family cremation or burial for their deceased loved one, once your services are provided, their loved one’s genetic record is either destroyed or inaccessible.

As a funeral director, sharing such information with the families you serve imparts additional professional relevance for their decision making.  It’s our obligation to provide information so that families can make educated funeral choices.  Sharing that you offer one last chance to preserve their deceased loved one’s genetic record could have generational implications.  Most of all, you are offering information they might not otherwise have known; isn’t that what professionals do for their customers?

A couple of points to consider:

  • Funeral Professionals are making it known that familial DNA has accumulating medical and genealogical value and there is a straightforward, economical and private way to preserve it.
  • Genetic developments are supplementing the knowledge already imparted by Funeral Professionals.  Families benefit by receiving the latest in genetic medical and genealogical applications, as well as physical DNA preservation.  This is now becoming an important option in Funeral Service.

From the Command Post, Cheers Y’all!  #thefuneralcommander

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